e-book Palliative and End of Life Care for Children and Young People: Home, Hospice, Hospital

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About palliative care

He would stop breathing up to 12 times a day. We took Louis home and continued to manage his problems breathing. He died when he as just 15 months old and was taken to the special bedroom at the hospice. Our Acorns community team worker explained what would happen and how we would feel. It was a horrible time, but it was a wonderful comfort to have the support. Sitemap Bookmark Print.


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Social Media Facebook Twitter Youtube. End of life care services: End of life care services are services to support those with advanced, progressive, incurable illness to live as well as possible until they die. This is not confined to discrete specialist services but includes those services provided as an integral part of the practice of any health or social care professional in any setting.

Palliative care: living with the dying

It is not a response to a particular disease or its stage, but is based on an assumption that people have needs for supportive care from the time that the possibility of a life-threatening condition is raised. Care of the dying: Care of the dying is the care of the patient and family in the last hours and days of life.

It incorporates four key domains of care, physical, psychological, social and spiritual and supports the family at that time and into bereavement. It is provided to children with high levels of complexity or intensity of nursing care needs.

End of Life Care and Symptom Control - Francis House Children's Hospice

Life-limiting Conditions: Life-limiting conditions are those for which there is no reasonable hope of cure and from which children or young people will die. Some of these conditions cause progressive deterioration rendering the child increasingly dependent on parents and carers. Life threatening Conditions: Life-threatening conditions are those for which curative treatment may be feasible but can fail, such as children with cancer. Children in long-term remission or following successful curative treatment are not included.

Although it is acknowledged there are similarities in the principles of palliative care for adults and children, it is crucial to emphasise underlying differences. Palliative care for children represents a special, albeit closely related field to adult palliative care. Life-threatening and life-limiting conditions can be classified into four groups: Group 1 Life-threatening conditions for which curative treatment may be feasible but can fail.

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Group 2 Conditions where premature death is inevitable, where there may be long periods of intensive treatment aimed at prolonging life and allowing participation in normal activities. Group 3 Progressive conditions without curative treatment options, where treatment is exclusively palliative and may commonly extend over many years.

Group 4 Irreversible but non-progressive conditions causing severe disability leading to susceptibility to health complications and likelihood of premature death. Hospice at Home works in partnership with parents and families and provides hands-on expert nursing care, on up to a hour basis, along with other elements of palliative care including: Emotional, psychological and social support, counselling, and spiritual care.

Access to specialist colleagues in other disciplines, such as physiotherapy, as required. Provision of information, support, education and training where needed to all carers both lay and professional. Specialist respite care. Family Family includes informal carers and all those who matter to the patient.